Friday, May 10, 2019

Is Englewood Disenfranchising Her Children?


I’m hearing a lot about the brawl having racial undertones behind it and the punishment that the CHILDREN should be and are facing. What I am not hearing is what role the district management (or lack there of) or the community has played in bringing this incident to fruition. 

What has the district done to help children value each others differences? 
What role has the district played in creating such an atmosphere? Yes fights happen, but what is being done to prevent them?

Are Englewood are teachers required to have any type of diversity training? Are they trained on how to promote equity & diversity in the classroom? 


Many employers are now requiring employees to attend diversity training. They actually have employees for the very purpose of promoting the concept of valuing diversity in the work environment. Do we?

The next question is how is equity and diversity promoted in the classroom? 
  • Are children given any guidance in valuing those who are different? 
  • Are we teaching them how to appreciate their differences? 
  • Are we teaching them how to identify commonalities? 
  • How to show empathy? 
  • How to negotiate through difficult situations? 
  • How to agree to disagree?
My guess is the answers to theses questions are NOT! Why? Because we as a city are not exhibiting these behaviors and values. Everything in this damn city is a public fight. Hill vs valley, Black vs Jew, rich vs poor, resident vs non-resident, Hispanic vs white Hispanic, and on and on and on. And as evidenced by the April 11, 2019 some are resorting to vigilantism (I’ll share more about my thoughts on that in another post).
So really Englewood, what example are we setting for the children? What is the educational system doing to teach children to do and be better? Is the fight really the children’s fault or is it our fault for not equipping them with the tools they need to successfully navigate through a disagreement? This incident tells me that our children are frustrated. 

They are telling us to do our jobs as adults, community members, city leaders, district leaders.

They are telling us they want to be heard. 

They are crying out for help. 

They are testing us and so far we are failing­čśô

Amy Jones Bulluck


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